Health Care In The Borderlands of Southern Colorado

Visit southern Colorado and you’ll find a blend of cultures. That’s partly because the region belonged to Mexico up until 1848. When the border moved south people from many backgrounds intermingled, melding their traditions. A new exhibit at the Trinidad History Museum looks at how the shifting nature of the borderlands shaped health care there. History Colorado’s Dawn DiPrince helped develop the exhibit “Borderlands of Southern Colorado: Remedios, Medicine and Health.”  Listen to her talk about this unexpected history on the Colorado Matters podcast

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Medical Aid In Dying: A Colorado Doctor’s Perspective

Dr. Cory Carroll helps his patients live well, as a primary care physician in Fort Collins. But when it’s clear they are terminally ill, and they ask, he’s there to help people die well. Listen to Dr. Carroll on the Colorado Matters podcast.

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Telluride poet Kierstin Bridger gives voice to prostitutes of the Old West in her collection, Demimonde.

Prostitutes in Old West mining towns were relegated to the shadowy world of night. They were often shunned by their communities… and yet they played an important role in the history of the west. Demimonde translates as “half world” – it refers to the unspoken world of night that old west prostitutes inhabited. Listen to poet Kierstin Bridger talk about her book Demimonde on the Colorado Matters podcast.

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Colorado Spring Gardening Questions Answered

Why mulch is your garden’s friend and weed barrier isn’t? Why growing cilantro isn’t easy? Take care of yourself while you take care of your garden. And more. Answers and advice from Colorado State University Master Gardener Loni Gaudet on the Colorado Matters podcast.

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Colorado Author Pam Houston’s Latest Book Is Deep Creek: Finding Hope In The High Country.

Twenty-five years ago author Pam Houston was living in her car. But her first book, Cowboys Are My Weakness, became a bestseller – giving voice to women across the nation — and it gave Houston just enough money to make a small downpayment on a ranch near Creede in Central Colorado. Now she reflects on what it means to be connected to that piece of land in her latest book, Deep Creek: Finding Hope In The High Country.

Listen to Pam Houston on the Colorado Matters podcast at cpr.org or wherever you get your podcasts.

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A Growing Number Of Coloradans Asked For Medical Aid In Dying Prescriptions Last Year

Emergency room doctor Harry Calvino’s wife Antje was among the 125 Coloradans who got prescriptions for drugs to help them die last year. That’s up some 74 percent from from the previous year, according to a recent state report. Most of those people were educated, white urbanites with a diagnosis of terminal cancer. Listen to Dr. Harry Calvino and Sam DeWitt of Compassion and Choices on Colorado Matters.

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A 100 Years Ago Arthur Carhart Had a Vision For Both Wilderness and Recreation On Public Lands

Trappers Lake

Trappers Lake – Courtesy Photo USDA – US Forest Service

A hundred years ago the US Forest Service considered putting cabins around a pristine lake in western Colorado. But thanks to a young landscape architect named Arthur Carhart, Trappers Lake stayed undeveloped and the concept of protected wilderness was born.

Hired as the first US Forest Service landscape architect on March 1, 1919, he was sent just a few months later to look at Trappers Lake as a possible spot for development. While he was there he met a couple of outdoorsmen camping at Trappers Lake.

“One night they got me in the cook tent and we argued from about nine until about two o’clock in the morning about the question of putting the cottages around the lake,their argument was the precious qualities of this lake belong to all the people and it’s a basic principle of wilderness against any other use whatever,” Carhart said.

Later that year he wrote to Aldo Leopold, “There is a limit to the number of lands of shoreline on the lakes; there is a limit to the number of lakes in existence; there is a limit to the mountainous areas of the world, and . . . there are portions of natural scenic beauty which are God-made, and . . . which of a right should be the property of all people.”

Retired Forest Service Chief Landscape Architect Jim Bedwell of Denver said Carhart also recognized the need for outdoor recreation infrastructure on public lands. Carhart wrote the forest service’s first recreation master plan. It was for the San Isabel National Forest west of Pueblo. Hear more about Carhart and his legacy: listen to Bedwell’s conversation with Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner on the Colorado Matters podcast.

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Million Dollar Restoration Planned For #Pueblo’s Historic Goodnight Barn

Barn 2014

Photo Courtesy of Goodnight Barn Preservation Committee

An old stone barn near Pueblo is about to get a million dollar facelift. It’s the last surviving structure of the northern headquarters of the Goodnight Cattle Company. The very real lives of old west cattlemen Charles Goodnight and Oliver Loving inspired the mini-series Lonesome Dove – based on the novel by Larry McMurtry. The 1871 Goodnight Barn is said to be one of the most important and endangered historic structures in the southwest. Laurel Campbell leads the Goodnight Barn Preservation Committee the organization working to preserve it. Listen to her conversation on Colorado Matters as part of the full show podcast at cpr.org

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Winter Gardening Tips From A Colorado Master Gardener

Thinking about your garden? You should be! It might be winter, but that doesn’t mean you should forget about your garden and landscape. There’s plenty to do to care for your garden now and plan for this summer. CSU Extension Master Gardener Loni Gaudet answered gardening questions and offered winter gardening tips. Listen to the conversation on cpr.org

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Boulder Poet Andrea Gibson Writes Through Love And War In ‘Lord Of The Butterflies’

Boulder poet Andrea Gibson weaves together love poetry with entries that explore protests, gun violence, homophobia and even war.

The complexities and depths of human emotion form the foundation of Gibson’s latest collection of poetry, “Lord of the Butterflies,”. Gibson, who prefers the pronouns they/them/their, spoke with Colorado Matters about incorporating anger and humor in their work.

Listen to the conversation and hear Gibson perform some of their work at cpr.org

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